Most Americans Think Their Own Group Faces Discrimination

Most Americans Think Their Own Group Faces Discrimination

New NPR, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Poll

Interviews were conducted by SSRS via telephone (including both landline and cell phone) using random – digit dialing.

Majorities in many ethnic, identity and racial groups in America believe that discrimination exists against their own group, across many areas of people’s daily lives, according to a poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The poll asked a wide range of questions about where Americans experience discrimination — from the workplace to the doctor’s office — and people’s perception of it. The groups polled include whites, blacks, Latinos, Asian-Americans, Native Americans and LGBTQ adults.

White Americans are among those who feel their group is discriminated against, with 55 percent saying discrimination exists against whites in the U.S. today.

These results are part of a large national statistically representative survey of 3,453 adults from Jan. 26 to Apr. 9.