Labor unions and “right-to-work”

Labor unions and “right-to-work”

New APM Research Lab Study Conducted via Telephone by SSRS

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule shortly on the Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) case. If the court rules in favor of the plaintiff, Mark Janus, it would strike down the current arrangement that all workers covered by the AFSCME union’s employment contract have to pay some “fair share” dues. That type of ruling would likely make a “right-to-work” policy, which allows public union-covered workers to opt out of paying any union dues, the law of the land. It would also likely weaken the power of unions across the United States, especially in the 22 states that have not previously passed “right-to-work” legislation.

In early June, the APM Survey asked a nationally representative survey of American adults what they think about labor unions and the “right-to-work” policy at the heart of the Janus case. The results of the APM Survey indicate Americans are evenly divided about whether union dues should be mandated or the choice of each worker. However, 62 percent of Americans feel the United States would be “better off” if unions were “stronger” compared to only 23 percent who prefer “weaker” unions. On both topics, differences of opinion exist by income, political party, race and more.