MINNESOTA’S DIVERSE COMMUNITIES: EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION IN THE STATE TODAY

MINNESOTA’S DIVERSE COMMUNITIES: EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION IN THE STATE TODAY

Survey Conducted by SSRS

Forty-five percent of Minnesotan adults believe that discrimination “generally speaking” exists against their racial or ethnic group. The same proportion, 45%, believes that their racial or ethnic group is either often or sometimes discriminated against when applying for jobs. Roughly one-third of Minnesotans believe that their racial or ethnic group is subject to discrimination by the police or in the housing market, and 17% believe their group is discriminated against when trying to vote.

Perceptions of discrimination against a respondent’s racial or ethnic group varies dramatically between Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPOC) in Minnesota on the one hand, and White Minnesotans on the other. While a substantial proportion, 38%, of Whites perceive that discrimination exists against their fellow White Minnesotans “in general” and when applying for jobs, that is less than half the proportion of all BIPOC Minnesotans who perceive discrimination against people of their racial or ethnic groups.

Read the Survey Findings and Report

View the Blog Post Comparing Other Data