MINNESOTA’S DIVERSE COMMUNITIES: PERCEPTIONS OF POLICING

MINNESOTA’S DIVERSE COMMUNITIES SURVEY: PERCEPTIONS OF POLICING

APM Research Lab Launches First of Several Reports from the Minnesota’s Diverse Communities Survey

SSRS designed a multi-modal approach to gather as representative a sample as possible within time and budget constraints.

Today The APM Research Lab launched the first in a series of reports based on a major and very unique statewide survey of Minnesotans.

In some ways, Minnesota’s Diverse Communities is a public opinion survey like many others. People answered questions via the internet or telephone about some of the most important issues facing the state. In other ways, however, this is a survey like none other.

At the core of this survey is our effort to provide as scientifically representative as possible a picture of the opinions and experiences of as many of Minnesota’s racial and ethnic groups as possible. The survey also aims to elevate the collective voices of communities that are typically underrepresented, sometimes stereotyped, and often not well understood by those who do not share their backgrounds.

Unlike nearly all surveys of Minnesotans, this one includes strong representation of the state’s Black, Indigenous, Latinx and Asian populations, including a large sample of the state’s single largest Asian ethnic group, Hmong Minnesotans. Note that while we are proud of accomplishing this level of representation, we would love for this survey to inspire funding for additional research (by us or others) with many other ethnic groups, including representative samples of Asian Indians, Somalis or any of the Native nations located within the state’s boundaries, just to name a few.

Over the next several weeks, in conjunction with partners at Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) News and elsewhere, we will be diving into the many topics covered by the survey, including policing and the courts, COVID-19, feelings of inclusion (or lack thereof), experiences with discrimination (or lack thereof), news media consumption, trust in institutions, public K-12 education, and experiences with arts and cultural opportunities.